Take you me for a sponge, my lord?

37,385 notes

imagine-jim-bones-and-spock:

imagine spock going back to vulcan to be honored with an award for scientific excellency or whatever

and even though its an award ceremony its still very solemn theres no clapping or cheering when people come on stage

finally its spocks turn and as he bows to the high priest and straightens up to receive his medal he hears a REALLY LOUD whistle from the audience

and he turns around and jims in the middle of all these stone faced vulcans like

216,981 notes

michaelsexford:

what i’d really like is for someone to objectively watch me for a week or so and then just sit down with me for a few hours and explain to me what i am like and how i look to others and what my personality is in detail and how i need to improve where do i sign up for that

(Source: teenagevevo, via parvuspapilio)

56,988 notes

connoisseur-of-mediocrity:

thefluffysheep:

songofages:

ela-j:

EXCUSE ME BUT THIS RING. NO ONE NOTICED IT?????

Actually I’ve seen people mention it since the first episode.

It’s Capaldi’s wedding ring. He never takes it off, even when acting. 

To add to the story, he refuses to take it off because when his acting career was struggling, his wife never gave up on him. When he landed his first major gig, he decided to not take it off, to represent he was there because of his wife’s support.

OH MY GOD

connoisseur-of-mediocrity:

thefluffysheep:

songofages:

ela-j:

EXCUSE ME BUT THIS RING. NO ONE NOTICED IT?????

Actually I’ve seen people mention it since the first episode.

It’s Capaldi’s wedding ring. He never takes it off, even when acting. 

To add to the story, he refuses to take it off because when his acting career was struggling, his wife never gave up on him. When he landed his first major gig, he decided to not take it off, to represent he was there because of his wife’s support.

OH MY GOD

(via theraichujesus)

Filed under i think i might die too adorable omg

130,137 notes

1) Learn to put on your bracelets and zip up your dresses by yourself. There will be times when you will be alone.
2) Get on a long plane ride. Look out the window. Understand the immensity of our world. Understand your insignificance. Understand your absolute importance.
3) Press the send button. If you don’t say it now, you never will.
4) Do not sneer at happiness or roll your eyes at sadness. Be aware that apathy is not healthy.
5) You are more than the amount of people who want to have sex with you.
6) That pit in your stomach when he doesn’t text you back, it shouldn’t be there. No one should be able to control you like that.
7) Shopping is cathartic. Buy the shoes and deal with one-ply toilet paper for a while.
8) It will get better, but it will never be perfect. Learn to live through the small moments of happiness. When they disappear, remember they will resurface.
9) I promise that cookie will not change anything (except that it will make you smile).
10) Please, please, take care of yourself. You are everything to somebody. You are everything to your self. That alone is enough.
things to remember, -n.m. (via thegirlwithfernweh)

(via kateargen)

677 notes

dressagelocked:

ruff-riders:

*Warning, this is a graphic read*



Tom Olive is some sort of great horse trainer from Ocala, he and his mustang Einstein are supposedly famous. Tom agreed to hold a clinic at my friend’s barn. On the first day, 9/13/14, Tom worked with a few horses. I’m mainly going to talk about Juno, a 4 year old curly mare who had only ever been ridden in her pen a few times in a halter by me.

My friend asked Tom to get her dead broke by the time he left. Tom tied her to the side of the barn and proceeded to beat her with a golf club that he had turned into a carrot stick. She tried to run but would just get yanked back around by the rope. She also tried to strike out and attack him, causing her to get beaten worse. Then he saddled and bridled her, with a bit, and got on her while she was still tied to the barn. He began to jab her sides with his spurs and beat her some more with his golf club.

Eventually he untied her and rode her around the field. The only cues he gave her were to slam her sides with the spurs and yank the crap out of her mouth. Eventually she got tired of his abusive behavior, threw him, and once again attacked him. He then beat her around the face/head with the golf club for a good five minutes or so before getting back on. He worked her so hard she fell to her knees. He would give her a break every now and then, so he could work with other horses. The clinic started at 10am and that’s when he started with Juno. At around 5 or 6, a group of 10 riders, including Tom on Juno, and me on a friend’s paint, Joker, got together to go for a ride up to the lake to have a campfire. For the whole day and ride I was working damage control as best I could, however if I had spoken up or called anyone I would have been banned from the property, and the horses we did manage to get away from him would not have been warned in time. Many of the riders trailered up, and did not witness the abuse. It’s about a 60 minute ride each way. Since my sister, jdh-mst-gnt, didn’t get off of work until 7, she didn’t make it to the lake until 8. She then asked if anyone wanted her to ride their horse back for them. Tom, whom she had never met, agreed to let her ride Juno back because he was sore and didn’t want to ride anymore that night. When she saw Juno she was in bad shape. There was no life in her eyes, she refused to graze, drool was pouring out of her mouth, and she just looked like she had given up on life. She took off the bridle and Juno was very confused, she had no idea how to let go of the bit. She put a rope halter on her and mounted up, not long after that the rest of the group mounted their horses as well. When Juno’s owner saw that we had taken the bit off he got very upset and demanded that she put it back on but she convinced him that she didn’t need it. It took about 10 minutes, but life slowly started to creep back into her. They led the group, in the pitch black, back to the barn and by the end of the ride she was pretty much back to normal and was even trying to graze. She was untacked, rinsed down, and put up for the night.


The second day, 9/14/14, the farrier was out in the morning for Juno and another horse. He said that under no circumstances was she to be worked in anyway because a tendon in her leg was about to blow. Of course Tom and her owner were very upset by this because they had planned to do the same as they had done yesterday to her. So Tom went to work on an 18yr old AndalusianX mare named Misty instead. He said he was gonna teach her how to lie down. He tied a rope to her front left leg and tied the other end to the saddle horn. Then he cranked her leg to her stomach and pulled her head between her knees. She put up one heck of a fight. She nearly flipped over more than once. It took nearly a half hour to finally throw her. This continued for at least another hour if not more. Tom kept saying that he couldn’t stop because she needed to know that he was in charge and she wasn’t going to win. By the time he was done with her she could barely walk. Her leg was all tore up, and was barely usable. She was in a lot of pain; she has permanent damage because of this. While he was ‘training’ Misty a lot of the spectators left because of how abusive it was, yet the whole time her owner was very happy and saying what a great job Tom was doing.
We stopped watching after an hour and went to talk with some other people who were still waiting for Tom to work with their horses. My sister and I ended up working with them instead and had no problems and then the owners, very wisely, loaded them back into their trailer and left. Tom and my friend were very disappointed that there were no more horses to ‘train’, so they took Juno out of her stall and worked with her instead of retiring for the day. Tom worked on getting her to climb onto a stone pedestal and then stuffed her in the corner of her stall and worked on moving her hindquarters. It didn’t take long for that hopeless expression to find its way back on her face…

I was just reading about this on COTH… they posted some of your photos and the first words out my mouth were “jesus fucking christ”. Poor things. No one should treat any animal this way. Glad you stood up and were able to convince other people to leave..

(via stirrupirons)

9,732 notes

bigbraingene:

60 Awesome Search Engines for Serious Writers


Finding the information you need as a writer shouldn’t be a chore. Luckily, there are plenty of search engines out there that are designed to help you at any stage of the process, from coming up with great ideas to finding a publisher to get your work into print. Both writers still in college and those on their way to professional success will appreciate this list of useful search applications that are great from making writing a little easier and more efficient.
Professional
Find other writers, publishers and ways to market your work through these searchable databases and search engines.
Litscene: Use this search engine to search through thousands of writers and literary projects, and add your own as well.
Thinkers.net: Get a boost in your creativity with some assistance from this site.
PoeWar: Whether you need help with your career or your writing, this site is full of great searchable articles.
Publisher’s Catalogues: Try out this site to search through the catalogs and names of thousands of publishers.
Edit Red: Through this site you can showcase your own work and search through work by others, as well as find helpful FAQ’s on writing.
Writersdock: Search through this site for help with your writing, find jobs and join other writers in discussions.
PoetrySoup: If you want to find some inspirational poetry, this site is a great resource.
Booksie.com: Here, you can search through a wide range of self-published books.
One Stop Write Shop: Use this tool to search through the writings of hundreds of other amateur writers.
Writer’s Cafe: Check out this online writer’s forum to find and share creative works.
Literary Marketplace: Need to know something about the publishing industry? Use this search tool to find the information you need now.
Writing
These helpful tools will help you along in the writing process.
WriteSearch: This search engine focuses exclusively on sites devoted to reading and writing to deliver its results.
The Burry Man Writers Center: Find a wealth of writing resources on this searchable site.
Writing.com: This fully-featured site makes it possible to find information both fun and serious about the craft of writing.
Purdue OWL: Need a little instruction on your writing? This tool from Purdue University in Lafayette, IN can help.
Writing Forums: Search through these writing forums to find answers to your writing issues.
Research 
Try out these tools to get your writing research done in a snap.
Google Scholar: With this specialized search engine from Google, you’ll only get reliable, academic results for your searches.
WorldCat: If you need a book from the library, try out this tool. It’ll search and find the closest location.
Scirus: Find great scientific articles and publications through this search engine.
OpenLibrary: If you don’t have time to run to a brick-and-mortar library, this online tool can still help you find books you can use.
Online Journals Search Engine: Try out this search engine to find free online journal articles.
All Academic: This search engine focuses on returning highly academic, reliable resources.
LOC Ask a Librarian: Search through the questions on this site to find helpful answers about the holdings at the Library of Congress.
Encylcopedia.com: This search engine can help you find basic encyclopedia articles.
Clusty: If you’re searching for a topic to write on, this search engine with clustered results can help get your creative juices flowing.
Intute: Here you’ll find a British search engine that delivers carefully chosen results from academia.
AllExperts: Have a question? Ask the experts on this site or search through the existing answers.
Reference
Need to look up a quote or a fact? These search tools make it simple.
Writer’s Web Search Engine: This search engine is a great place to find reference information on how to write well.
Bloomsbury Magazine Research Centre: You’ll find numerous resources on publications, authors and more through this search engine.
Merriam-Webster Dictionary and Thesaurus: Make sure you’re using words correctly and can come up with alternatives with the help of this tool.
References.net: Find all the reference material you could ever need through this search engine.
Quotes.net: If you need a quote, try searching for one by topic or by author on this site.
Literary Encyclopedia: Look up any famous book or author in this search tool.
Acronym Finder: Not sure what a particular acronym means? Look it up here.
Bartleby: Through Bartleby, you can find a wide range of quotes from famous thinkers, writers and celebrities.
Wikipedia.com: Just about anything and everything you could want to look up is found on this site.
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Find all the great philosophers you could want to reference in this online tool.
Niche Writers
If you’re focusing on writing in a particular niche, these tools can be a big help.
PubGene: Those working in sci-fi or medical writing will appreciate this database of genes, biological terms and organisms.
GoPubMd: You’ll find all kinds of science and medical search results here.
Jayde: Looking for a business? Try out this search tool.
Zibb: No matter what kind of business you need to find out more about, this tool will find the information.
TechWeb: Do a little tech research using this news site and search engine.
Google Trends: Try out this tool to find out what people are talking about.
Godchecker: Doing a little work on ancient gods and goddesses? This tool can help you make sure you have your information straight.
Healia: Find a wide range of health topics and information by using this site.
Sci-Fi Search: Those working on sci-fi can search through relevant sites to make sure their ideas are original.
Books
Find your own work and inspirational tomes from others by using these search engines.
Literature Classics: This search tool makes it easy to find the free and famous books you want to look through.
InLibris: This search engine provides one of the largest directories of literary resources on the web.
SHARP Web: Using this tool, you can search through the information on the history of reading and publishing.
AllReaders: See what kind of reviews books you admire got with this search engine.
BookFinder: No matter what book you’re looking for you’re bound to find it here.
ReadPrint: Search through this site for access to thousands of free books.
Google Book Search: Search through the content of thousands upon thousands of books here, some of which is free to use.
Indie Store Finder: If you want to support the little guy, this tool makes it simple to find an independent bookseller in your neck of the woods.
Blogging
For web writing, these tools can be a big help.
Technorati: This site makes it possible to search through millions of blogs for both larger topics and individual posts.
Google Blog Search: Using this specialized Google search engine, you can search through the content of blogs all over the web.
Domain Search: Looking for a place to start your own blog? This search tool will let you know what’s out there.
OpinMind: Try out this blog search tool to find opinion focused blogs.
IceRocket: Here you’ll find a real-time blog search engine so you’ll get the latest news and posts out there.
PubSub:  This search tool scours sites like Twitter and Friendfeed to find the topics people are talking about most every day.

bigbraingene:

60 Awesome Search Engines for Serious Writers

Finding the information you need as a writer shouldn’t be a chore. Luckily, there are plenty of search engines out there that are designed to help you at any stage of the process, from coming up with great ideas to finding a publisher to get your work into print. Both writers still in college and those on their way to professional success will appreciate this list of useful search applications that are great from making writing a little easier and more efficient.

Professional

Find other writers, publishers and ways to market your work through these searchable databases and search engines.

  1. Litscene: Use this search engine to search through thousands of writers and literary projects, and add your own as well.
  2. Thinkers.net: Get a boost in your creativity with some assistance from this site.
  3. PoeWar: Whether you need help with your career or your writing, this site is full of great searchable articles.
  4. Publisher’s Catalogues: Try out this site to search through the catalogs and names of thousands of publishers.
  5. Edit Red: Through this site you can showcase your own work and search through work by others, as well as find helpful FAQ’s on writing.
  6. Writersdock: Search through this site for help with your writing, find jobs and join other writers in discussions.
  7. PoetrySoup: If you want to find some inspirational poetry, this site is a great resource.
  8. Booksie.com: Here, you can search through a wide range of self-published books.
  9. One Stop Write Shop: Use this tool to search through the writings of hundreds of other amateur writers.
  10. Writer’s Cafe: Check out this online writer’s forum to find and share creative works.
  11. Literary Marketplace: Need to know something about the publishing industry? Use this search tool to find the information you need now.

Writing

These helpful tools will help you along in the writing process.

  1. WriteSearch: This search engine focuses exclusively on sites devoted to reading and writing to deliver its results.
  2. The Burry Man Writers Center: Find a wealth of writing resources on this searchable site.
  3. Writing.com: This fully-featured site makes it possible to find information both fun and serious about the craft of writing.
  4. Purdue OWL: Need a little instruction on your writing? This tool from Purdue University in Lafayette, IN can help.
  5. Writing Forums: Search through these writing forums to find answers to your writing issues.

Research

Try out these tools to get your writing research done in a snap.

  1. Google Scholar: With this specialized search engine from Google, you’ll only get reliable, academic results for your searches.
  2. WorldCat: If you need a book from the library, try out this tool. It’ll search and find the closest location.
  3. Scirus: Find great scientific articles and publications through this search engine.
  4. OpenLibrary: If you don’t have time to run to a brick-and-mortar library, this online tool can still help you find books you can use.
  5. Online Journals Search Engine: Try out this search engine to find free online journal articles.
  6. All Academic: This search engine focuses on returning highly academic, reliable resources.
  7. LOC Ask a Librarian: Search through the questions on this site to find helpful answers about the holdings at the Library of Congress.
  8. Encylcopedia.com: This search engine can help you find basic encyclopedia articles.
  9. Clusty: If you’re searching for a topic to write on, this search engine with clustered results can help get your creative juices flowing.
  10. Intute: Here you’ll find a British search engine that delivers carefully chosen results from academia.
  11. AllExperts: Have a question? Ask the experts on this site or search through the existing answers.

Reference

Need to look up a quote or a fact? These search tools make it simple.

  1. Writer’s Web Search Engine: This search engine is a great place to find reference information on how to write well.
  2. Bloomsbury Magazine Research Centre: You’ll find numerous resources on publications, authors and more through this search engine.
  3. Merriam-Webster Dictionary and Thesaurus: Make sure you’re using words correctly and can come up with alternatives with the help of this tool.
  4. References.net: Find all the reference material you could ever need through this search engine.
  5. Quotes.net: If you need a quote, try searching for one by topic or by author on this site.
  6. Literary Encyclopedia: Look up any famous book or author in this search tool.
  7. Acronym Finder: Not sure what a particular acronym means? Look it up here.
  8. Bartleby: Through Bartleby, you can find a wide range of quotes from famous thinkers, writers and celebrities.
  9. Wikipedia.com: Just about anything and everything you could want to look up is found on this site.
  10. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Find all the great philosophers you could want to reference in this online tool.

Niche Writers

If you’re focusing on writing in a particular niche, these tools can be a big help.

  1. PubGene: Those working in sci-fi or medical writing will appreciate this database of genes, biological terms and organisms.
  2. GoPubMd: You’ll find all kinds of science and medical search results here.
  3. Jayde: Looking for a business? Try out this search tool.
  4. Zibb: No matter what kind of business you need to find out more about, this tool will find the information.
  5. TechWeb: Do a little tech research using this news site and search engine.
  6. Google Trends: Try out this tool to find out what people are talking about.
  7. Godchecker: Doing a little work on ancient gods and goddesses? This tool can help you make sure you have your information straight.
  8. Healia: Find a wide range of health topics and information by using this site.
  9. Sci-Fi Search: Those working on sci-fi can search through relevant sites to make sure their ideas are original.

Books

Find your own work and inspirational tomes from others by using these search engines.

  1. Literature Classics: This search tool makes it easy to find the free and famous books you want to look through.
  2. InLibris: This search engine provides one of the largest directories of literary resources on the web.
  3. SHARP Web: Using this tool, you can search through the information on the history of reading and publishing.
  4. AllReaders: See what kind of reviews books you admire got with this search engine.
  5. BookFinder: No matter what book you’re looking for you’re bound to find it here.
  6. ReadPrint: Search through this site for access to thousands of free books.
  7. Google Book Search: Search through the content of thousands upon thousands of books here, some of which is free to use.
  8. Indie Store Finder: If you want to support the little guy, this tool makes it simple to find an independent bookseller in your neck of the woods.

Blogging

For web writing, these tools can be a big help.

  1. Technorati: This site makes it possible to search through millions of blogs for both larger topics and individual posts.
  2. Google Blog Search: Using this specialized Google search engine, you can search through the content of blogs all over the web.
  3. Domain Search: Looking for a place to start your own blog? This search tool will let you know what’s out there.
  4. OpinMind: Try out this blog search tool to find opinion focused blogs.
  5. IceRocket: Here you’ll find a real-time blog search engine so you’ll get the latest news and posts out there.
  6. PubSub: This search tool scours sites like Twitter and Friendfeed to find the topics people are talking about most every day.

(via themidnightroses)